Category Archives: Pensions

Federal News Highlights and Parliamentary Business for October 24

parliament-daily-news-updateParliament begins debate on bill to increase Canada Pension Plan rates

 

 

 

On Friday, Second Reading debate began on Bill C-26, An Act to amend the Canada Pension Plan, the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board Act and the Income Tax Act, new legislation to implement the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) enhancement agreed to in June by Federal and Provincial Finance Ministers.

If passed, Bill C-26 would, among other things, amend the CPP to:

  • increase the maximum level of pensionable earnings by 14% as of 2025 with the replacement rate increasing from 25% of pensionable earnings to 33%.
  • phase in a 1% increase in contributions over 5 years from 2019 to 2024.
  • Increase the upper limit on maximum pensionable earnings from $72,500 to $82,700 between 2024-2025 and phase in a 4% contribution rate on earnings in this range over those 2 years.

Additional related amendments to the Income Tax Act outlined in Bill C-26 would:

  • increase the Working Income Tax Benefit to compensate low income pensioners for the automatic clawback of the GIS due to the increase in CPP benefits.
  • provide a deduction (as opposed to tax credits) for additional employee contributions related to the increase in the maximum limit on pensionable earnings.

True to form, the Conservatives criticized the modest CPP enhancement as a tax increase on hard working Canadians and seemed likely to vote against the measure.

The NDP was largely supportive of the enhancement but was critical of the modest scale of the increase and the drawn out phase-in schedule.

The full text of Friday’s House debate on Bill C-26 can be found here.

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What the New CPP Agreement Means for You

pensions CPP

The agreement  reached in Vancouver to enhance the CPP last week was historic in nature. Still,  some people will benefit far more than others. Many Ontario workers, for example,  would have been better off with the provincial pension plan that was abandoned by the Ontario Government within days of the signing of the CPP accord.

There is no question that Canada’s finance ministers reached an historic agreement in Vancouver on June 20. There is also no question that the changes in CPP design that the ministers agreed upon represent an eventual increase in CPP benefits for all workers when compared to the current CPP design.

That said, two additional questions need to be asked when assessing the agreement:

1)      To what extent are the workers most in need of a boost in their retirement savings getting the increase in benefits they need to truly retire in dignity and security. In other words, are the CPP changes agreed upon in Vancouver targeted towards those most in need ; and

2)      Are Ontario workers – who comprise almost 40% of the Canadian labour force – better off under the new CPP regime than they would have been under the Ontario Retirement Pension Plan (ORPP) that was scheduled to be fully implemented in 2019 – the first year of a 7-year phase-in of the agreed upon CPP changes that won’t be completed until 2025? This is relevant given that with the signing of the CPP accord, the Ontario Government moved within days to kill its ORPP initiative.

Background to the Vancouver agreement

Before answering these two questions, it is important to provide some context to the discussions that took place in Vancouver on June 20th.

The task for the finance ministers meeting in Vancouver was to see if there was a formula for reform that had a chance of getting 7 provinces containing two-thirds of Canada’s population (the amending formula for the CPP) to buy into. This was always going to be a challenge given that B.C., Saskatchewan and Quebec had been clear in the previous federal-provincial meeting in December, 2015 that they had little appetite for any sort of CPP/QPP enhancement and Manitoba’s brand new Conservative government was almost certain to join this “sceptic” group. Continue reading

Trudeau, Wynne Pension Visions on Very Different Paths

15-10-28 trudeau wynne cpp hug

Despite the big hug and a short-term promise by Trudeau to help implement Ontario’s new pension plan, a look beneath the surface reveals serious obstacles to reconciling Wynne’s and Trudeau’s pension visions.

Prime Minister Elect  Justin Trudeau has promised to do what Stephen Harper pointedly refused to do – help Premier Kathleen Wynne implement Ontario’s new pension plan.

But reconciling Trudeau’s long-term vision of enhancing the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) with Wynne’s “ready-to-go” Ontario Retirement Pension Plan (ORPP), could prove tricky.

Trudeau to help on short-term implementation issues

The Conservative government refused to change federal regulations to help establish and collect contributions for the Ontario Retirement Pension Plan (ORPP), which is due to start collecting premiums in January, 2017.

In fact, the pension issue had become a significant point of conflict between the federal Conservative government and the Ontario Liberal government. During the recent campaign, Mr. Harper went so far as to say that he was “delighted” that his decision not to help Ms. Wynne “is making it more difficult for the Ontario government to proceed.”

But what a difference an election makes! The two Liberal leaders had a brief meeting at Queen’s Park on Tuesday and there appeared to be a complete meeting of the minds on the pension issue – at least in the short term.

According to a statement issued after the meeting, the new federal Liberal government will “direct the Canada Revenue Agency and the Departments of Finance and National Revenue to work with Ontario officials on the registration and administration of the [ORPP].”

Registration refers to the fact that unless a pension plan is registered under the terms of the federal Income Tax Act, employee and employer contributions are not tax deductible. Once registered, pension contributions and investment earnings are tax-exempt until benefits are paid to a retiree.

Administration primarily refers to piggy-backing ORPP premium deductions on the existing CPP payroll contribution infrastructure. Ontario had issued a request for proposal for a third party to help administer the plan because of the outgoing Conservative government’s refusal to co-operate. Now it won’t need that third-party partner, which means the ORPP should be less expensive to operate. Continue reading

Five Key Issues Facing the Trudeau Government

Trudeau

In its first few months, the newly elected Trudeau government will be facing a range of issues including infrastructure, pensions, and a middle class tax cut.

In this post, Canada Fact Check takes a look at five key issues facing the newly elected Trudeau government for the period leading up to, and including, the early-Spring budget.

Infrastructure

The new Liberal government’s top priority will be to quickly implement its high profile infrastructure program.

Trudeau says a Liberal government will run deficits for three straight years and will double spending on infrastructure to stimulate economic growth.

According to a Liberal policy paper, the Liberal fiscal plan would see “a modest short-term deficit” of less than $10 billion for each of the first three years and then a balanced budget by the 2019-2020 fiscal year.

The policy paper suggests that over the next decade the Liberals would spend $125 billion on new infrastructure investment — about twice the amount the Conservatives had committed for infrastructure. Much of this new infrastructure would be financed through a new Canada Infrastructure Development Bank.

Liberal infrastructure investments would focus on three areas: public transit, social infrastructure such as affordable housing and child care, and environmental projects like clean energy.

Projects funded would reflect the priorities of the provinces and municipalities. Continue reading